TITLE

OVERCOMING THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT: TEACHING CANADIAN STUDIES IN MEXICO

AUTHOR(S)
Wood, Duncan
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Canadian Foreign Policy (CFP);2007, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p93
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on teaching Canadian studies to undergraduates in Mexico. It states that it is important that Canadian history is presented to students not just as the story of the dominance of the Anglo-Saxon peoples in North America or as a story of conquest. It mentions that treating Canadian history as the history of a developing country allows for all kinds of comparisons, however, when located in the context of authors such as Wallestein, Canadian economic and political development becomes more familiar to Mexican undergraduate students.
ACCESSION #
31707397

 

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