TITLE

Preliminary ADVANCE trial data do not confirm ACCORD trial findings

AUTHOR(S)
Haigh, Christen; Brietzke, Stephen A.
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
Hem/Onc Today;3/10/2008, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the interim results from the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) trial, which failed to demonstrate that patients assigned to intensive treatment to lower blood glucose had an increased risk for death. The findings of the ADVANCE trial also failed to confirm results from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. According to Rory Collins, chairman of the ADVANCE Data Monitoring and Safety Committee, the interim results from ADVANCE did not confirmed the adverse mortality trend.
ACCESSION #
31672243

 

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