TITLE

The Impact of Firm Resources on Subsidiary's Competitiveness in Emerging Markets: An Empirical Study of Singaporean SMEs' Performance in China

AUTHOR(S)
Yang Xia; Yiyun Qiu; Zafar, Ahmed U.
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Multinational Business Review (St. Louis University);Summer2007, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Many FDI studies focus on the advantages that businesses can gain through internationalization and internalization. More recent research has indicated that such traditional theories or perspectives may not sufficiently explain the subsequent success or failure of a firm's operation in a foreign country, because the advantages gained through FDIs could be greatly affected by their strategic management in the host country environment. This study focused on the issue of a firm's resources on its subsidiary's competitiveness in a foreign country. A survey was undertaken in China. All companies participating in the study were small- and medium-sized Singapore-China joint ventures and Singaporean wholly owned enterprises in China. The findings indicated that the variance in a firm's performance in a foreign country can be largely explained by the six dimensions of firm resources: (1) technological resources, (2) owner/top manager's managerial skills and capabilities, (3) employee's Guanxi skills, (4) employee's professional/technical knowledge, (5) the firm's internal relationships and, (6) the firm's external relationships. Among these six dimensions, employees' professional knowledge and Guanxi skills, as well as a firm's internal and external relationships, are significant predictors of Singaporean SMEs' success in China.
ACCESSION #
31659406

 

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