TITLE

TOKENISM IN GAELIC: THE LANGUAGE OF APPEASEMENT

AUTHOR(S)
Cox, Richard A. V.
PUB. DATE
October 1998
SOURCE
Scottish Language;1998, Issue 17, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The paper highlights the emblematic use of Gaelic language in public promotions. It cites that Gaelic speakers reaches to 69,000 across Scotland based on the promotional exercise, Gáidhlig '96, entitled "Some Facts on Gaelic". It mentions several Gaelic usages in museums, offices and facilities, advertising companies, schools, and road signs or announcements. Moreover, periodical and local papers prefers the mix use of languages in Gaelic and English format. However, the author infers that the various symbolic uses of Gaelic language in public, limits the value of the language and calls it language of appeasement.
ACCESSION #
31459613

 

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