TITLE

FILM FRAMES: CINEMATIC LITERACY AND SATIRIC VIOLENCE IN CONTEMPORARY MOVIES

AUTHOR(S)
Bishop, Ellen
PUB. DATE
January 1997
SOURCE
Post Script;Winter/Spring97, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This essay extends the term literacy to not only mean the students' growing abilities to read printed and filmed texts but also to read their own understandings of popular culture. It explores the cinematic literacy and satiric violence in contemporary movies and television shows line the extreme violence in "The Itchy and Scratchy Show," a part of the American animated sitcom "The Simpsons." The essay also uses truisms about parental responsibility and describes the structuralist genre theory. It concludes with a brief sketch of the complex literacy confined in the rhetorical and satirical dimensions of films.Kar
ACCESSION #
31414931

 

Related Articles

  • `Simpsons' begins '95 as off-net champ.  // Hollywood Reporter;1/12/95, Vol. 335 Issue 29, p50 

    Reports that the television sitcom `The Simpsons' retained its lead over all other syndicated strips for the first week of 1995. Average rating per share; Other sitcoms' ratings.

  • It's Bart's world --TV just lives in it. Adalian, Josef // Daily Variety;5/17/2007, Vol. 295 Issue 33, pA2 

    The article provides some insights into the creation of the animated television program, "The Simpsons," citing its influence on American pop culture and television programming. "Family Guy" creator Seth MacFarlane says that the show was the first show to make aggressive use of pop-culture...

  • The Simpsons Turns 300.  // Weekly Reader News - Senior;3/28/2003, Vol. 81 Issue 22, p7 

    Focuses on the possibility that the television program 'The Simpsons,' will be the longest-running situation comedy in television history as of March 2003. Television programs which hold the title; Success of the show; History of the show.

  • DOH! Richmond, Ray // Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition;2/11/2003, Vol. 377 Issue 15, pS-1 

    Focuses on the animated television program 'The Simpsons' which will become the longest running comedy series in television history in Fall 2003. Longest running comedy and animation programs prior to 'The Simpsons'; Awards won by the program; Actors who have lent their voices for characters of...

  • EPISODES EVER. Richmond, Ray // Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition;2/11/2003, Vol. 377 Issue 15, pS-8 

    Presents ten best episodes of the animated comedy program 'The Simpsons,' ranked by a group of fans of the program. Plot of the episode 'Last Exit to Springfield'; Original telecast date of the episode 'Cape Feare'; Actor who provided guest voice-over in the episode 'Homer's Phobia.'

  • Writing The Simpsons: A Case Study of Comic Theory. FINK, EDWARD J. // Journal of Film & Video;Spring/Summer2013, Vol. 65 Issue 1/2, p43 

    A case study is presented on how the writers of the animated television comedy series "The Simpsons" use comic theory. Information is provided on the various aspects of comic theory, which the author suggests is prevalent in every episode of "The Simpsons," including incongruity, superiority,...

  • Bart Simpson.  // Storyworks;Nov/Dec2010, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p25 

    The article reviews the animated television program "The Simpsons," created by Matt Groening.

  • How "Seinfeld" and "The Simpsons" Changed TV Forever. Masullo, Gina; Stanton, Zack // Wilson Quarterly;Fall2014, Vol. 38 Issue 4, p5 

    The article explores the cultural impact of the debut of the television comedy programs "Seinfeld" and "The Simpsons" in 1989. Emphasis is given to topics such as the selfish characters of "Seinfeld" created by comedians Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, idioms from "The Simpsons," and the...

  • 'Simpsons' voice crew underworked, underpaid. Richmond, Ray // Hollywood Reporter -- International Edition;4/13/2004, Vol. 383 Issue 21, p13 

    At the TV program "The Simpsons," principal voices Dan Castellaneta, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Julie Kavrier, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer are said to be holding out for a raise from $125,000 an episode to a reported $360,000-per in order to voice the show's 16th season next fall....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics