TITLE

The impact of nutritional and exercise strategies for aging bone and muscle

AUTHOR(S)
Candow, Darren G.
PUB. DATE
February 2008
SOURCE
Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism;Feb2008, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p181
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This symposium addressed recent evidence suggesting that nutritional intervention and resistance-training strategies may be important for aging bone and muscle. The physiological consequences of aging and the potential mechanistic actions of nutritional aids during resistance training were emphasized.
ACCESSION #
31358681

 

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