TITLE

Archaeological Survey of Eastern Inglefield Land, Northwest Greenland

AUTHOR(S)
Darwent, John; Darwent, Christyann; LeMoine, Genevieve; Lange, Hans
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Arctic Anthropology;2007, Vol. 44 Issue 2, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Archaeological survey by foot, boat, and helicopter was undertaken in the eastern portion of Inglefield Land, northwestern Greenland. Although the research interests of the Inglefield Land Archaeology Project (ILAP) are focused on the late Thule-early Historic contact period, all cultural features were documented. A total of 1376 features, including winter houses, tent rings, fox traps, caches, hearths, kayak stands, and burials were recorded during pedestrian survey of three broad regions, which represent the entire culture history of the High Arctic from ca. 4200 years ago to modern use of the region by Inughuit hunters. Settlement pattern analysis suggests greater use of easterninost Inglefield Land by Paleoeskimo inhabitants compared to Thule/Historic groups and overall more short-term occupation (i.e., hunting forays) during the Paleoes-kimo period. Thule winter houses are concentrated in the Glacier and Marshall Bay regions and secondarily at Cape Grinnell.
ACCESSION #
31345090

 

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