TITLE

Do Marie Curie nurses enable more patients with advanced cancer to remain and die at home in the UK?

AUTHOR(S)
Higginson, IJ; Wilkinson, S
PUB. DATE
May 2000
SOURCE
Palliative Medicine;May2000, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p246
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Evaluates the care provided by Marie Curie nurses to advanced cancer patients who remain and die at home in Great Britain. Hours of care provided; Qualifications of nurses; Factors predicting which patients did not die at home; Patients associated with home death.
ACCESSION #
3128714

 

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