TITLE

REGIONALISM REVISITED: THE EFFORT TO STREAMLINE GOVERNANCE IN BUFFALO AND ERIE COUNTY, NEW YORK

AUTHOR(S)
Bucki, Craig R.
PUB. DATE
February 2008
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2008, Vol. 71 Issue 1, p117
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article distinguishes the two procedures for implementing regional change. The old method presumes that business leaders and elected officials must devise proposals for government consolidation, while the new procedural regionalism anticipates that such proposals will originate among the general populace. It presents a partial plan for new regionalism in Buffalo and Erie County, New York, and demonstrates the inability of old procedural regionalism to convince Erie County residents to change the structure of their local governance.
ACCESSION #
31249543

 

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