TITLE

Wrong Map

AUTHOR(S)
Mukherjee, Siddhartha
PUB. DATE
May 2000
SOURCE
New Republic;05/08/2000, Vol. 222 Issue 19, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the development of a technique for gene sequencing under U.S. government by scientist J. Craig Venter and his creation of Celera Genomics Corp. Information on the Human Genome Project; Benefit to Celera's scientists from sequencing technology developed in federally funded labs; Information on the right to patent genes in the nation; Possibility that if the Congress passed a law outlawing gene patenting, it might prevent scientists from moving into private sector.
ACCESSION #
3059568

 

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