TITLE

DTS-DVD marriage makes for engaging cinema

AUTHOR(S)
Ventre, Michael
PUB. DATE
April 2000
SOURCE
Daily Variety;04/20/2000, Vol. 267 Issue 35, pA6
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on Digital Theater Sound (DTS) and DVD technology. Pioneer release of the motion picture `Apollo 13,' directed by Ron Howard; Two options in DVD audio formats; Use of DTS technology for delivering 5.1; Equipment needed for viewers to enjoy DTS on DVD.
ACCESSION #
3032904

 

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