TITLE

Bridging the gap: the effectiveness of teaming a stroke coordinator with patient's personal physician on the outcome of stroke

AUTHOR(S)
Mayo, Nancy E.; Nadeau, Lyne; Ahmed, Sara; White, Carole; Grad, Roland; Huang, Allen; Yaffe, Mark J.; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Age & Ageing;Jan2008, Vol. 37 Issue 1, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objectives to test the hypothesis as to whether persons newly discharged into the community following an acute stroke and assigned a stroke case manager would experience, compared to usual post-hospital care, better health-related quality of life (HRQL), fewer emergency room visits and less non-elective hospitalisations. Design a stratified, balanced, evaluator-blinded, randomised clinical trial. Setting five university-affiliated acute-care hospitals in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Participants persons (n = 190) returning home directly from the acute-care hospital following a first or recurrent stroke with a need for health care supervision post-discharge because of low function, co-morbidity, or isolation. Intervention for 6 weeks following hospital discharge a nurse stroke care manager maintained contact with patients through home visits and telephone calls designed to coordinate care with the person's personal physician and link the stroke survivor into community-based stroke services. Measurements the primary outcome was the Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the Short-Form (SF)-36 survey. A secondary outcome was utilisation of health services. Also measured was the impact of stroke on functioning. Measurements were made at hospital discharge (baseline), following the 6-week intervention and at 6-months post-stroke. Results the average age of the participants was 70 years. Discharge was achieved on average 12 days post-stroke and most participants had had a stroke of moderate severity. There were no differences between groups on the primary outcome measure, health services utilisation, or any of the secondary outcome measures. Conclusion for this population, there was no evidence that this type of passive case management inferred any added benefit in terms of improvement in health-related quality of life or reduction in health services utilisation and stroke impact, than usual post-discharge management.
ACCESSION #
30038144

 

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