TITLE

Parental willingness to enter a child in a controlled vaccine trial

AUTHOR(S)
Langley, Joanne M.; Halperin, Scott A.; Mills, Elaine L.; Eastwood, Brian
PUB. DATE
February 1998
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Feb98, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a study which examines the reasons why parents are stimulated to enrol or not enrol their children in a randomized controlled vaccine trial. What findings of an Australian study of parents of children enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial of an asthma medication revealed; Methodology used to conduct the study; Results and discussion of th study.
ACCESSION #
298846

 

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