TITLE

Cannabis treatment outcomes among legally coerced and non-coerced adults

AUTHOR(S)
Copeland, Jan; Maxwell, Jane C.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2007, Vol. 7, p111
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Treatment seeking for cannabis dependence in general, and particularly the number of criminal justice referrals to cannabis treatment, has increased over the past decade. This study aims to compare the characteristics, psychosocial functioning and treatment outcome of those legally coerced into cannabis treatment compared to those entering treatment without legal coercion. Methods: This study is a retrospective audit of the administrative clinical records of 27,198 adults presenting to public Texas treatment programs with cannabis as their primary drug problem between 2000 and 2005. Results: Of the 69% legally coerced into treatment, there was less psychological distress and greater likelihood of having completed treatment compared with non-coerced clients. Participants who were legally coerced into treatment were also more likely to have received less intensive forms of treatment and to have not used cannabis in the month prior to 90-day post-treatment follow-up. Conclusion: More public health information is needed on cannabis dependence and increased availability of subsidised early and brief interventions in a variety of primary health care settings would reduce the late presentations of the more severely impaired voluntary clients. The limitations of this dataset are discussed.
ACCESSION #
29361997

 

Related Articles

  • Dutch Drug Policies Do Not Increase Marijuana Use, First Rigorous Comparative Study Finds.  // Ascribe Newswire: Medicine;5/3/2004, p129 

    In the first rigorous study comparing marijuana use in the Netherlands and the U.S., researchers Craig Reinarman, D. A. Cohen and Hendrien L. Kaal have found no evidence that decriminalization of marijuana leads to increased drug use. The findings appear in the May issue of "American Journal of...

  • The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy: Cannabis in Amsterdam and in San Francisco. Reinarman, Craig; Cohen, Peter D.A.; Kaal, Hendrien L. // American Journal of Public Health;May2004, Vol. 94 Issue 5, p836 

    Objectives. We tested the premise that punishment for cannabis use deters use and thereby benefits public health. Methods. We compared representative samples of experienced cannabis users in similar cities with opposing cannabis policies--Amsterdam, the Netherlands (decriminalization), and San...

  • Not So Harmless? Today's Marijuana Has Highest Levels of THC.  // Nutrition Health Review: The Consumer's Medical Journal;2007, Issue 99, p17 

    The article discusses the severity of marijuana abuse due to the presence of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an active chemical in cannabis and one of the oldest hallucinogenic drugs known. According to a report released by the White House, the potency of marijuana increased in 2006 to the highest...

  • Dutch Drug Policies Do Not Increase Marijuana Use, First Rigorous Comparative Study Finds.  // Ascribe Newswire: Medicine;5/13/2004, p35 

    In the first rigorous study comparing marijuana use in the Netherlands and the U.S., researchers have found no evidence that decriminalization of marijuana leads to increased drug use. The findings appear in the May issue of "American Journal of Public Health." Craig Reinarman, professor of...

  • Cannabis Use and Disorder Transitions Among a Mixed Community Sample of At-Risk Adolescents and Adults: A Prospective New Zealand Study. Bashford, Jan; Copeland, Jan; Flett, Ross // Open Addiction Journal;2013, Vol. 6, p8 

    Introduction and Aims: The trajectories of cannabis use disorder (CUD) require more comprehensive delineation to expedite recognition of incubating dependence among high-risk users. This study examined baseline cannabis use and CUD over 12 months using DSM-IV/ICD10 diagnoses to distinguish...

  • Growing importance of effective treatment for cannabis use.  // Drugnet Europe;Apr-Jun2015, Issue 90, p4 

    The article focuses on a new in-depth study Treatment of cannabis-related disorders in Europe by the Europe Monitoring centres for Drug and Drug Addiction (EMCDDD), which found the growing importance of cannabis use disorders in European drug policy.

  • Epidemiological Data are Lacking. Braune, Ulrich // Deutsches Aerzteblatt International;1/11/2016, Vol. 113 Issue 1/2, p9 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Risks Associated With the Non-Medicinal Use of Cannabis" by Dr. Eva Hoch, Prof. Dr. Udo Bonnett and Prof. Dr. Rainer Thomasius.

  • Largest Epidemiological Study not Mentioned. Grotenhermen, Franjo // Deutsches Aerzteblatt International;1/11/2016, Vol. 113 Issue 1/2, p9 

    A letter to the editor is presented which noted how the authors of the article "Risks Associated With the Non-Medicinal use of Cannabis" failed to explain the risks of cannabis in a differentiated manner successfully.

  • A Comparison of Internet-Based Participant Recruitment Methods: Engaging the Hidden Population of Cannabis Users in Research. Temple, Elizabeth C.; Brown, Rhonda F. // Journal of Research Practice;2011, Vol. 7 Issue 2, Special section p1 

    While a growing number of researchers are embracing Internet-based data collection methods, the adoption of Internet-based recruitment methods has been relatively slow. This may be because little is known regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of Internet-based...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics