TITLE

Horseshoe Bend, Alabama

AUTHOR(S)
Kunzig, Robert
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
Military History;Jan/Feb2008, Vol. 24 Issue 10, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a history of the battle between U.S. forces and Indians at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama. On March 27, 1814, Major General Andrew Jackson's troops wiped out more than 800 Creeks, the largest number of Indians ever killed in a single battle, at a place called Horseshoe Bend. Many were shot trying to flee across the Tallapoosa River. Jackson's stated goal had been to exterminate them.
ACCESSION #
28099940

 

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