TITLE

HEALTHCARE ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS OF IMMIGRANT AND US-BORN WOMEN IN HAMTRAMCK, MICHIGAN: A METRONET STUDY

AUTHOR(S)
Markova, Tsveti; Dean, Flora; Neale, Victoria
PUB. DATE
October 2007
SOURCE
Ethnicity & Disease;Autumn2007, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p650
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective: Recognizing recent immigrant migration into Hamtramck, Michigan, our objective was to conduct a survey focused on female patients seeking health care in an ethically diverse primary care clinic. Design: Cross-sectional exploratory questionnaire survey study. Setting: A family medicine center (FMC) in Hamtramck, Michigan. Participants: A convenience sample of women patients, age ≥18 years of age who understood English and/or written or spoken Bangla. Main Outcome Measures: Health-seeking behaviors and satisfaction with the US healthcare system. Results: 156 women patients participated. Sixty-seven (43%) were immigrants, primarily representing three ethnicities: Bangladeshi (61%), Yemeni (19%) and Bosnian (13%). The mean length of residence in the United States was eight years. Compared with US-born, the immigrants were more likely to report a household income of less than $15,000; however they had similar rates of health insurance. US-born women reported less satisfaction with our healthcare system. Immigrants were more likely to visit their physician when feeling ill, and to bring a friend or relative to help alleviate communication problems. Immigrant women were also more likely to express a desire for a physician who was female and/or from a similar cultural background. Conclusions: The study findings suggest the need for physicians to be culturally sensitive to the particular needs of the immigrant female population they serve and to treat each patient within the context of her environment.
ACCESSION #
28020612

 

Related Articles

  • Perception of Barriers to Immunization Among Parents of Hmong Origin in California. Baker, Dian L.; Dang, Michelle T.; Ly, May Ying; Diaz, Rafael // American Journal of Public Health;May2010, Vol. 100 Issue 5, p839 

    Objectives. We explored factors associated with perception of barriers to immunization among parents of Hmong origin in California, whose children experience persistent immunization inequities even with health insurance. Methods. A partnership of academic researchers and members of the Hmong...

  • David Version 2.0 goes live.  // Michigan Citizen;6/17/2012, Vol. 34 Issue 32, pA14 

    The article offers information on the lifestyle modification of a 49-year-old former workaholic to improve his health.

  • WHY THE FRENCH GET AWAY WITH IT.  // Accountancy;Dec1995, Vol. 116 Issue 1228, p64 

    Investigates the reason why French people stay healthy despite their high-fat diet and high alcohol intake. Focus on the immunity of the French to heart disease; Analysis of the ingredients in the French diet which result to their healthy condition; Evidence of health benefits of alcohol.

  • One step back. Rubin, Courtney // Shape;Jun2000, Vol. 19 Issue 10, p118 

    Relates the setbacks being experienced by the author after a year of healthy habits. Food cravings; Stresses; Continuation of exercise; Key to emerging from setbacks. INSETS: Stats.;Workout schedule.;What helped me most..

  • Making health habitual. Polak, Louisa // British Journal of General Practice;Feb2013, Vol. 63 Issue 607, p70 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Making health habitual: the psychology of "habit-formation" and general practice," by B. Gardner, P. Lally and J. Wardle in the journal's 2012 DOI:10.3399/bjgp12X659466.

  • One week to Zen!  // NW;11/19/2012, Vol. 20 Issue 47, p76 

    The article offfer tips to feel fitter and fresher.

  • Chef secret Stick a banana in your fruit bowl; it emits a natural gas that ripens anything nearby. Micco, Nicci // Self;Mar2006, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p70 

    The article presents a healthy eating plan in the U.S.

  • Change for good.  // Good Health (Australia Edition);Oct2012, p40 

    The article reports on the findings of a study in the "European Journal of Social Psychology," on changing bad habits into a healthy habit which can take between 18 and 254 days.

  • Keep mind and body active to age well. Hoffman, Alyson // Malakoff News (TX);5/30/2008, Vol. 99 Issue 22, p12A 

    The article presents a perspective on healthy living.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics