TITLE

Tracking cold blooded wildlife

AUTHOR(S)
Breisch, Al
PUB. DATE
February 1998
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Feb98, Vol. 52 Issue 4, Wild in New York p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes how to track amphibian and reptile species with the use of radio telemetry. Learning habitat needs and seasonal movements of cold blooded animals; Equipment needed; Rules in transmitter attachment on animals; Use of temperature recorders to log temperature changes on animal surroundings.
ACCESSION #
280070

 

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