TITLE

Anglo-Saxon Broadax

PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
Military History;May2007, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article describes the Anglo-Saxon broadax. This broadax evolved out of the two-handed Dane-ax, introduced to Great Britain by Viking invaders in the late 10th century. The Saxon version involved folding a strip of "soft" iron around a mandrel to create a socket, through which craftsmen inserted a 2- to 3-foot wooden shaft. The strength necessary for its effective use--not to mention its relatively cheap cost--suited the temperament and purses of the professional Saxon warriors, or huscarls.
ACCESSION #
27987317

 

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