TITLE

Untitled

AUTHOR(S)
Savvas, Antony
PUB. DATE
November 2007
SOURCE
Computer Weekly;11/20/2007, p89
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that British Office of Communications (Ofcom) has fined broadband provider Prodigy Inc. for slowing its customers to switch to another provider. Ofcom has been investigating Prodigy since February 2007 after customer complaints. It is reported that Prodigy had failed to provide migration codes easily to its customers in order to allow them to switch over to another broadband provider. As per the new Ofcom rules, switching over to another broadband provider is easily possible. Ofcom has introduced the new rules in 2006.
ACCESSION #
27962740

 

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