TITLE

Kirby: Abstinence-only programs don't work

PUB. DATE
December 2007
SOURCE
Contemporary Sexuality;Dec2007, Vol. 41 Issue 12, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a study written by Doug Kirby, PhD, that abstinence-only sex education programs do not work in the U.S. According to Kirby, there is no any strong evidence that any abstinence program delays the initiation of sex, hastens the return to abstinence or reduces the number of sexual partners among teenagers. The study that was conducted for the nonpartisan National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. The study shows that two-thirds of the examined sex education programs that focus on both abstinence and contraception had positive effects on teen sexual behavior. Moreover, the House of Representatives has passed a bill that includes $141 million for abstinence education.
ACCESSION #
27888832

 

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