TITLE

Protecting the WESTERN TOAD

AUTHOR(S)
Young, Rachel
PUB. DATE
December 2007
SOURCE
Soldiers;Dec2007, Vol. 62 Issue 12, p37
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article explains that Fiander Lake in the Rainier Training Area of Fort Lewis, Washington is a protected sanctuary for the Western toads. It is stated that Jim Lynch, a fish and wildlife biologist for the Fort Lewis Fish and Wildlife Program is studying the Western toad to help in their conservation and preservation. Western toads are candidates for the state's list of endangered species. Lynch explained that it is important for scientists to learn and understand Western toads to better protect them from possible extinction.
ACCESSION #
27729280

 

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