TITLE

Children's Phoneme Identification in Reverberation and Noise

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Carole E.
PUB. DATE
February 2000
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Feb2000, Vol. 43 Issue 1, p144
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study assessed the effects of reverberation, noise, and their combination on listeners' identification of consonants and vowels in naturally produced nonsense syllables presented at different sensation levels (re: speech recognition threshold). A secondary purpose of this study was to assess listeners' identification of voicing, manner, and place of articulation for consonants at 50 dB SL in the reverberation, noise, and combined conditions. Listeners, aged 6-30 years, identified consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel (CVCV) stimuli presented at four different sensation levels (re: speech recognition threshold) of 30, 40, 50, and 60 dB SL in 4 listening conditions: (a) an optimal listening situation (no reverberation, no noise), (b) reverberation only (1.3 seconds), (c) noise only (+13 dB S/N against a multitalker babble), and (d) reverberation plus noise. Results showed that all listener groups achieved maximum consonant identification performance at 50 dB SL. Vowel identification scores were unaffected by SL. Statistical analyses revealed that children's ability to identify consonants varied according to listening condition. For example, children's consonant identification abilities reached adult-like levels of performance at about age 14 years in the reverberation-only and noise-only listening conditions. However, in the reverberation-plus-noise listening condition, children's consonant identification abilities do not mature until the late teenage years. The ability to identify vowels, on the other hand, develops much earlier. A feature analysis of the consonant data showed that for all 3 features (voicing, manner, and place), identification scores were highest in the control condition, similar for the reverberation-only and noise-only conditions, and lowest in the reverberation-plus-noise condition. Voicing was easier for listeners to identify than manner or place of articulation features in reverberation and noise. Taken together, these results suggest t...
ACCESSION #
2772137

 

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