TITLE

Toymakers' stock woes hamper kids TV upfront

AUTHOR(S)
Friedman, Wayne
PUB. DATE
February 2000
SOURCE
Advertising Age;2/7/2000, Vol. 71 Issue 6, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the poor stock performance among toy companies in the U.S. which could translate into fewer advertising dollars spent in the children's upfront television marketplace. Hasbro and Mattel have both seen falling stock prices. On February 3, 2000, Mattel's stock was near its 52-week low at $10.88 per share as was Hasbro at $16.44. Mattel's problems stemmed from its troubled acquisition of the Learning Co. Conditions became so bad that Mattel asked media sellers for significant cutbacks on TV buys during the busy fourth quarter. Last week, embattled Mattel CEO Jill Barad resigned.
ACCESSION #
2751111

 

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