TITLE

HIV testing of patients: Let's waive the waiver

AUTHOR(S)
Tyndall, Mark W.; Schechter, Martin T.
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;1/25/2000, Vol. 162 Issue 2, p210
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the passing of a resolution by the Canadian Medical Association to recommend that any patient undergoing a procedure where a health care worker could accidentally be exposed to the patient's bodily fluids be required to sign a waiver that would allow testing for HIV and hepatitis while ensuring patient confidentiality; The impracticality of the waiver; Reasons why the waiver will not work including the patient's right to refuse testing despite the waiver.
ACCESSION #
2731202

 

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