TITLE

Cat Fight on the Border

AUTHOR(S)
Voas, Jeremy
PUB. DATE
October 2007
SOURCE
High Country News;10/15/2007, Vol. 39 Issue 19, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the impact of the expanded barriers and fencing under construction and planned on the international border implemented by the Department of Homeland Security on jaguar migration routes in the U.S. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, if all border-crossing corridors used by jaguars are blocked, the 12- 18-foot walls may result in the extirpation of the jaguar in the country. The federal Real ID Act of 2006 allows the agency's secretary to waive environmental laws in the name of national security.
ACCESSION #
27270767

 

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