TITLE

Percutaneous Cholecystostomy Is an Effective Treatment for High-Risk Patients with Acute

AUTHOR(S)
Patel, Mrunal; Miedema, Brent W.
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
American Surgeon;Jan2000, Vol. 66 Issue 1, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
We sought to determine the safety, efficacy, and outcome of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in all patients undergoing the procedure at our institutions. We reviewed 53 consecutive cases of acute cholecystitis seen at our hospitals over 5.5 years in which PC was performed at the initial treatment. Follow-up was obtained by chart review and telephone questionnaire. Acute cholecystitis was the primary admitting diagnosis in 18 cases. In the remaining 35, cholecystitis developed during hospitalization. All patients were considered high surgical risks on the basis of the presence of comorbid conditions. The gallbladder was successfully catheterized under radiologic guidance in all patients and with no immediate procedure-related morbidity. Acute cholecystitis resolved in 44 of 53 patients (83%), whereas nine patients (17%) did not improve clinically after PC and died during the same hospitalization. A total of 33 (62%) eventually survived hospitalization. Elective cholecystectomy was done in 25 patients with no mortality. After cholecystectomy, three of these patients subsequently died of other causes, whereas 22 are alive. Eight patients did not undergo cholecystectomy because of underlying medical conditions or because they had acalculous cholecystitis. These patients remained free of biliary problems after removal of their cholecystostomy tube, but two have subsequently died of nonbiliary conditions. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a safe, effective treatment for high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis. Cholecystostomy can be followed by elective cholecystectomy at a later time if the patient's condition permits or by expectant conservative management in patients who have had acalculous cholecystitis or have a very high mortality risk with surgery.
ACCESSION #
2723497

 

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