TITLE

Survey Says

PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Marketing Health Services;Fall2007, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the health benefits of red wine. The author reports that sales of red win surged after positive media coverage reported on two red wine-positive studies in November 2006. The two studies, which were conducted by the Harvard Medical School and the National Institute on Aging, focused on the possibility that resveratrol, a substance in red wine, might slow down the aging process. The article reveals that in the 20 weeks following the reports, red wines accounted for almost 53% of table wine dollars spent, while retailers saw dollar gains of 8.5%.
ACCESSION #
27149844

 

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