TITLE

ANALYSIS OF PARALYSIS

AUTHOR(S)
Heath, Dan; Heath, Chip
PUB. DATE
November 2007
SOURCE
Fast Company;Nov2007, Issue 120, p68
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the importance of utilizing simplicity in corporate strategies to avoid decision paralysis. Illustrative examples in the article include a study published in "The Journal of the American Medical Association" (JAMA) of doctors who couldn't decide between two new drug choices, an anecdote from the book "Around the Corporate Campfire" by Evelyn Klein, and a mental health provider with too many core values. The theme is that too many choices make decision making more difficult.
ACCESSION #
27062398

 

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