TITLE

QUO VADIS CBT? TRANS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPIES: INTERVIEWS WITH THE CURRENT LEADERSHIP IN COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPIES

AUTHOR(S)
David, Daniel
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Cognitive & Behavioral Psychotherapies;Sep2007, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p171
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has emerged from the work of Dr. Aaron T. Beck and Dr. Albert Ellis. However, it has been extended well beyond the borders of the research groups of these two founders, all over the world, in Asia, Europe, South America, and the USA. The question, taking into account the unprecedented expansion of cognitive-behavioral therapy, is whether current cognitive-behavioral therapy is still a coherent and homogenous approach. Therefore, we have interviewed the major representatives (presidents and/or board members) of major cognitivebehavioral psychotherapy organizations in Asia, Europe, South America, and the USA. Interestingly, both at a theoretical and practical level, the perspectives are quite coherent suggesting that the cognitive-behavioral approach is a robust approach with cultural adaptations, which do not affect the main architecture of the theory and practice of CBT.
ACCESSION #
26916213

 

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