TITLE

Venice and Rome in the Addresses and Dispatches of Sir Henry Wotton: First English Embassy to Venice, 1604–1610

AUTHOR(S)
Ord, Melanie
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
Seventeenth Century;Spring2007, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the addresses and dispatches of Sir Henry Wotton in his first mission to Venice from 1604 to 1610, paying particular attention to his strategic representations of Rome in attempting to introduce Protestantism into the signory and thereby further to cement Anglo-Venetian relations. It begins by exploring Wotton's concern to monitor English travellers to Rome, and proceeds to consider his addresses to the Venetian Senate in the wake of the Venetian-Papal split of 1606-7, in which he utilised ‘the Myth of Venice’ to stir up anti-Papal feeling. Connecting both sections of this article is a consideration of Wotton's anti-Jesuit sentiments, read partly in the context of Anthony Munday's The English Roman Life (1582); significantly, Wotton seeks to justify his covert attempts to secure the religious conversion of Venice by representing this as a countermove to Jesuit proselytising. It is a central concern of this article to approach such interplays between Venice, Rome, and England through a close reading of Wotton's rhetorical strategies.
ACCESSION #
26774327

 

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