TITLE

Intake of vitamin A-rich foods and lung cancer risk in Taiwan: with special reference to garland chrysanthemum and sweet potato leaf consumption

AUTHOR(S)
Yi-Ru Jin; Meei-Shyuan Lee; Jang-Hwa Lee; Hon-Ki Hsu; Jau-Yeong Lu; Shin-Shin Chao; Kow-Tong Chen; Saou-Hsing Liou; Luo-Ping Ger
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition;Sep2007, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p477
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between the consumption of local common foods that are rich in vitamin A and the risk of lung cancer in Taiwan. A total of 301 incident lung cancer cases, 602 hospital controls, and 602 neighborhood controls were recruited. The consumption of 13 food items and vitamin supplements was estimated by use of a food frequency questionnaire. The conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk with each control group as reference by adjustment of covariates. A reduced risk for lung cancer was found to be associated with increased intakes of vitamin A, α-carotene, and β-carotene from 13 food items. More servings of vegetables (AOR for the highest versus the lowest quartile = 0.67-0.70, 95% CI = 0.42-1.08, plinear trend = 0.04), garland chrysanthemum (AOR for the highest versus the lowest tertile = 0.58-0.74, 95% CI = 0.37-1.14, plinear trend ≤ 0.04) and sweet potato leaves (AOR for the highest versus the lowest tertile = 0.43-0.65, 95% CI = 0.28-0.96, plinear trend ≤ 0.03) were associated with the reduced risk for lung cancer. In conclusion, higher consumption of vitamin A-rich vegetables, especially garland chrysanthemum and sweet potato leaves might provide potential protection from lung cancer.
ACCESSION #
26715180

 

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