TITLE

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor fetopathy: long-term outcome

AUTHOR(S)
Laube, Guido F.; Kemper, Markus J.; Schubiger, Gregor; Neuhaus, Thomas J.
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition;Sep2007, Vol. 92 Issue 5, pF402
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Fetal exposure to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality. Long-term follow-up of three patients with fetal ACEI exposure revealed impaired renal function in two, severe hypertension and proteinuria in one and isolated polycythaemia in all three. Careful long-term follow-up of children with ACEI fetopathy is recommended.
ACCESSION #
26686198

 

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