TITLE

Doctors 'coerced' into taking unwanted jobs

AUTHOR(S)
Phillips, Lucy
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
People Management;9/6/2007, Vol. 13 Issue 18, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the impact of problems with the recruitment system of the British National Health Service on junior doctors. It has been revealed that the collapse of a new computer system led to many doctors receiving offers from their second or third option before their first choice. Under the health service's medical training application service (MTAS), doctors were given 24 hours to accept or decline an offer, which meant many took up a less desirable post, thinking it was the best offer they would receive.
ACCESSION #
26635430

 

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