TITLE

The Location in Cartilage of Infectious Retrovirus in Cats Infected with Feline Leukemia Virus

AUTHOR(S)
Arnoczky, Steven P.; Swenson, Cheryl; Egerbacher, Monika; Gardner, Ken; Caballero, Oscar; Burns, Meghan
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;Sep2007, Vol. 89-A Issue 9, p2030
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Previous studies have suggested that articular cartilage allografts were not likely to transmit infectious retrovirus since viral DNA could not be isolated from chondrocytes of infected individuals. However, the ability of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage to harbor and transmit a retrovirus has not been examined. We hypothesized that articular cartilage fragments, but not isolated chondrocytes, from cats systemically infected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are capable of transmitting infectious retrovirus. Methods: Fresh cartilage segments and chondrocytes isolated from cats systemically infected with feline leukemia virus were used in this study. Feline embryonic fibroblast cells were cocultured with segments of cartilage, isolated chondrocytes, or fragments of cortical bone from each infected cat. The FeLV p27 antigen was measured in the coculture media by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, FeLV proviral nucleic acids were quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction with use of DNA extracted from feline embryonic fibroblast cell cocultures as well as isolated chondrocytes. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess for FeLV p27 antigen in both intact cartilage fragments and isolated chondrocytes. Results: Feline embryonic fibroblast cells cocultured with cartilage fragments from each of the five FeLV-infected cats all demonstrated high levels of proviral DNA, indicating transmission of infective virus. In addition, media from all cocultures of feline embryonic fibroblast cells and chondral fragments became positive for p27 antigen, indicating active viral replication. In contrast, cocultures of feline embryonic fibroblast cells and isolated chondrocytes from all FeLV-infected cats were negative for proviral DNA and p27 antigen. Likewise, no proviral nucleic acids could be detected in isolated chondrocytes from any infected cats. Cocultures of feline embryonic fibroblast cells with cortical bone fragments were positive for proviral DNA and p27 antigen. Immunohistochemical staining of cartilage fragments from FeLV-infected cats demonstrated the presence of p27 antigen throughout the extracellular matrix, but the p27 antigen was not detected in isolated chondrocytes. Conclusions: Articular cartilage fragments can readily transmit infectious retrovirus, but isolated chondrocytes were likely not the source of the infectious virus because they did not harbor proviral DNA or p27 antigen. Clinical Relevance: Because donor-cell viability improves the long-term function of chondral allografts (precluding the use of secondary sterilization procedures employed for tendon and bone allografts), these results underscore the importance of rigorous donor screening when the use of articular cartilage allografts is being considered.
ACCESSION #
26613667

 

Related Articles

  • Difficulties in demonstrating long term immunity in FeLV vaccinated cats due to increasing age-related resistance to infection. Wilson, Stephen; Greenslade, Juliet; Saunders, Gillian; Holcroft, Catherine; Bruce, Lynn; Scobey, Andy; Childers, Tedd; Sture, Gordon; Thompson, James // BMC Veterinary Research;2012, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p125 

    Background: Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a pathogen causing fatal illness in cats worldwide, and as such there is a high demand for products to protect against disease. The duration of immunity provided by an inactivated FeLV vaccine, Versifel FeLV, when administered to cats of the target...

  • FREQUÊNCIA DO VÍRUS DA LEUCEMIA FELINA (VLFe) EM FELINOS DOMÉSTICOS (Felis catus) SEMIDOMICHTADOS NOS MUNICÍPIOS DE PELOTAS E RIO GRANDE. Meinerz, Ana Raquel Mano; Antunes, Tatiana de Ávila; de Souza, Lorena Leonardo; Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; de Faria, Renata Osório; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Gomes, Fabiane Resende; Nobre, Márcia de Oliveira; Reischak, Dilmara; Schuch, Luis Filipe Damé; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo // Ciência Animal Brasileira;2010, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p90 

    Considering the importance of FeLV in the feline clinic, as well as the likely agent spread from a symptomatic or asymptomatic feline bearer, this work has as objective the study of the frequency of FeLV in felines residents in the cities of the Pelotas and Rio Grande, municipalities located in...

  • FREQUENCY OF THE FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS (FELV) IN DOMESTIC FELINES (FELIS CATUS) SEMI-DOMICILED IN THE MUNICIPALITIES OF PELOTAS AND RIO GRANDE. Meinerz, Ana Raquel Mano; Antunes, Tatiana de Ávila; de Souza, Lorena Leonardo; Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; de Faria, Renata Osório; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Gomes, Fabiane Resende; Nobre, Márcia de Oliveira; Reischak, Dilmara; Schuch, Luis Filipe Damé; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo // Ciência Animal Brasileira;2010, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p90 

    Considering the importance of FeLV in the feline clinic, as well as the likely agent spread from a symptomatic or asymptomatic feline bearer, this work had as objective the study of the frequency of FeLV in felines residents in the cities of Pelotas and Rio Grande, municipalities located in the...

  • Risk factors and effect of selective removal on retroviral infections prevalence in Belgian stray cats. Garigliany, M.; Jolly, S.; Dive, M.; Bayrou, C.; Berthemin, S.; Robin, P.; Godenir, R.; Petry, J.; Dahout, S.; Cassart, D.; Thiry, E.; Desmecht, D.; Saegerman, C. // Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association;1/9/2016, Vol. 178 Issue 2, preceding p45 

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of several risk/protective factors and predictors on the prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infections in 302 stray cats captured during a trap-neuter-release programme in a mixed urban-rural area...

  • The transdermal recombinant feline leukemia vaccine: Top 10 questions. Ford, Richard B. // DVM: The Newsmagazine of Veterinary Medicine;Jun2005, Vol. 36 Issue 6, SPECIAL SECTION p2 

    In this article the author discusses the top 10 questions related to the transdermal recombinant feline leukemia vaccine. The first question asks about the difference between the recombinant canarypox-vectored vaccine and the other feline leukemia virus vaccines (FeLV) available in the market....

  • Viral Determinants of FeLV Infection and Pathogenesis: Lessons Learned from Analysis of a Natural Cohort. Bolin, Lisa L.; Levy, Laura S. // Viruses (1999-4915);Sep2011, Vol. 3 Issue 9, p1681 

    Detailed analysis has been performed over many years of a geographic and temporal cohort of cats naturally infected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Molecular analysis of FeLV present in the diseased tissues and application of those viruses to experimental systems has revealed unique isolates...

  • Feline leukemia virus outbreak in the critically endangered Iberian lynx ( Lynx pardinus): high-throughput sequencing of envelope variable region A and experimental transmission. Geret, C.; Cattori, V.; Meli, M.; Riond, B.; Martínez, F.; López, G.; Vargas, A.; Simón, M.; López-Bao, J.; Hofmann-Lehmann, R.; Lutz, H. // Archives of Virology;May2011, Vol. 156 Issue 5, p839 

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species. During winter/spring 2006/7, a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) outbreak of unexpected virulence killed about 2/3 of the infected Iberian lynxes. All FeLV-positive animals were co-infected with feline hemoplasmas. To further characterize the...

  • Virus protection for your cat. Marder, Dr. // Prevention;Mar95, Vol. 47 Issue 3, p126 

    Offers information on two diseases that affect the immune systems of cats, Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). Symptoms; Diagnosing through blood tests; Treatment; The vaccine for FeLV. INSETS: Caring for an infected cat;Can humans get these diseases?.

  • Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus infections in cats in the Pisa district of Tuscany, and attempts to control FeLV infection in a colony of domestic cats by vaccination. Bandecchi, P.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Magi, M.; Palamidessi, A.; Prati, M. C. // Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association;4/22/2006, Vol. 158 Issue 16, p555 

    The seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in 203 apparently healthy domestic cats living in the district of Pisa, central Italy, was 11.3 per cent, and the prevalence of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) was 8.4 per cent. The prevalence of FIV depended significantly on the lifestyle...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics