TITLE

Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Proven and Contemporary Treatment

AUTHOR(S)
Loo, Colleen
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Issues;Sep2007, Issue 80, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a treatment approach for depression which uses a controlled seizure in the patient who is under anaesthetic. It cites several improvements made to these approach to achieve safer and more effective use of ECT. It is argued that ECT can result in the growth of new brain cell by repairing brain circuits that can be responsible for depression. In addition, some side-effects of ECT, including the long-term memory loss, headache and nausea, have also been described.
ACCESSION #
26449939

 

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