TITLE

SSRIs Associated With Low Rate of Birth Defects, Studies Show

AUTHOR(S)
Elliott, William T.
PUB. DATE
August 2007
SOURCE
Travel Medicine Advisor;Aug2007, Vol. 17 Issue 8, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the correlation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and birth defects. As stated in the Sloan Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study, the use of SSRI were not associated with birth defects when it is taken by women in their childbearing years. It is also noted that SSRIs are likely to be small in terms of absolute risks.
ACCESSION #
26267117

 

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