TITLE

Female lawmakers react to Edwards's fashion remark

AUTHOR(S)
Kaplan, Jonathan E.
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Hill;7/26/2007, Vol. 14 Issue 91, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the reaction of Democratic female lawmakers to former Senator John Edwards fashion remark at the pink blazer Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton wore at a presidential debate on July 23, 2007 in the U.S. Edwards' remark yielded a variety of interpretations, although everyone agreed that he is comfortable with intelligent and strong women.
ACCESSION #
26212343

 

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