TITLE

Does workforce size and mix influence patient satisfaction?

PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Nursing Standard;7/25/2007, Vol. 21 Issue 46, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an analysis on the influence of workforce size and mix on patient satisfaction. The data released by the Healthcare Commission reveals that the top-rated trusts, based on many aspects of performance such as service quality, employ 1.63 nurses per bed, while the bottom-rated trusts have 1.55 nurses per bed. An analysis of complaint figures as a measure of overall patient dissatisfaction does not reveal any association between nurse staffing level and patient dissatisfaction.
ACCESSION #
26097009

 

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