TITLE

After Seattle

AUTHOR(S)
Ponnuru, Ramesh
PUB. DATE
December 1999
SOURCE
National Review;12/31/1999, Vol. 51 Issue 25, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article asserts that the Democratic party sustained the most damage during the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle, Washington in 1999 due to its intense protests. In 1997, a coalition of Republicans and Democrats failed to give President Bill Clinton congressional authorization to negotiate trade deals. So he tried to win Democratic support for trade by promising to link trade deals to international standards on labor and the environment. However, in 1999, an official business-labor advisory board had endorsed the administration's position. Then John Sweeney, head of the AFL-CIO, issued a clarifying statement explaining that he was endorsing only the labor standards and not trade liberalization.
ACCESSION #
2605792

 

Related Articles

  • By a Side Door.  // National Review;11/1/1993, Vol. 45 Issue 21, p17 

    The article argues that the side agreements forged by U.S. President Bill Clinton with the North American Free Trade Agreement on environmental and labor laws have the capacity to change trade policy into a system extending regulation. It explores how governments try to attract investment or...

  • Government Alters 51 Percent Regulation. Sloan, Carole // Home Textiles Today;9/5/2005, Vol. 26 Issue 47, p4 

    Reports on changes to the regulation regarding support and assistance from the U.S. government that requires a 51 percent U.S. content. Benefits of the changes for U.S. exporters; Determination of the value of U.S. content; Details on the application of the new regulation.

  • Statement on House Ways and Means Committee Action... Clinton, Bill // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;10/13/97, Vol. 33 Issue 41, p1524 

    Presents the statement of the United States President Bill Clinton on House Ways and Means Committee Action on fast-track trading authority legislation on October 8, 1997. Why the country must continue to break down unfair foreign trade barriers to American products and services.

  • Trade pacts face major battle. Morrissey, James A. // Textile World;Oct97, Vol. 147 Issue 10, p18 

    Expresses uncertainty over legislation that would give President Bill Clinton fast-track authority to negotiate new international trade agreements for the United States. Chief trade negotiator's warning that the nation could be left out of its most crucial trading bloc if it fails to approve...

  • REGULATORY REFORM AND MARKET OPENNESS: PROCESSES TO ASSESS EFFECTIVELY THE TRADE AND INVESTMENT IMPACT OF REGULATION.  // OECD Papers;2007, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p1 

    The article discusses the beneficial and adverse effects of regulatory requirements to the economy of several countries. It presents the possible outcome of the regulatory requirements including the halting of profits from trade liberalization. However, it also shows the beneficial outputs which...

  • More Trade with China? Buckley Jr., William F. // National Review;12/31/1999, Vol. 51 Issue 25, p54 

    The article comments on conflicting opinions within the Republican Party of the U.S. as to the state of trade between the U.S. and China and the admittance of China into the World Trade Organization (WTO). Union head John Sweeney says that the deal is a grave mistake and hypocritical. On the...

  • Remarks on Signing the Trade and Development Act of 2000. Clinton, William J. // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;5/22/2000, Vol. 36 Issue 20, p1142 

    Presents the text of a statement given by United States President Bill Clinton on May 18, 2000 which deals with the signing of the Trade and Development Act of 2000.

  • Antitrust at the Global Level. Wood, Diane P. // University of Chicago Law Review;Winter2005, Vol. 72 Issue 1, p309 

    This article examines the ideal scope for international antitrust rules. It focuses on the particular substantive and procedural provisions that an international antitrust code should have. It is opined that global convergence on competition law has come a long way since the years after the...

  • Selling the Rope.  // National Review;8/1/1994, Vol. 46 Issue 14, p15 

    This article addresses the congressional dispute over export controls in the U.S. as of August 1994. The administration of U.S. President Bill Clinton has permitted the use of the COCOM export control system and is supporting a new version of the U.S. Export Administration Act that prioritizes...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics