TITLE

Poison Pill

AUTHOR(S)
Egan, Mary Ellen; Posadas, Dennis
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;7/2/2007, Vol. 3 Issue 12, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article features scientist Baldomero Olivera. His research into cone snail venom has resulted in a novel drug for treating chronic pain and may yield new drugs for epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. Olivera's biotechnology company Cognetix is currently developing four conopeptide compounds to treat pain and myocardial infarction. In 2007, he received the 2007 Harvard Foundation Scientist of the Year award for his lifetime research into cone snail venom.
ACCESSION #
26052303

 

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