TITLE

Are Emerging Market TNCs Sensitive to Corporate Responsibility Issues?

AUTHOR(S)
Hall, Carrie
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Corporate Citizenship;Summer2007, Issue 26, p30
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article contends that principled corporate behavior will become an essential business strategy for emerging-market transnational corporations (TNC). The United Nations Global Compact, the world's largest voluntary corporate citizenship initiative, embodies the hope for the promotion of responsible corporate citizenship among leading emerging-market TNC around the world. This is in contrast to examples of human rights violations, worker exploitation and corruption carried out by other emerging TNC.
ACCESSION #
25898406

 

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