TITLE

THINK TANK

PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
ICIS Chemical Business;6/11/2007, Vol. 2 Issue 70, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article emphasizes the need for biofuel advocates to reconsider the production of ethanol from biomass, predominantly from corn, in the U.S. Producers expect an increase in food prices as a result of turning fields over fuel production. According to the Grocery Manufacturers Association, the biofuels policy of the country should be pursued thoughtfully and deliberately, taking into consideration the possible unintended consequences of a sharp increase in the use of corn for fuel.
ACCESSION #
25735700

 

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