TITLE

Consumer-Driven Healthcare: Information, Incentives, Enrollment, and Implications for National Health Expenditures

AUTHOR(S)
Hughes-Cromwick, Paul; Root, Sarah; Roehrig, Charles
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
Business Economics;Apr2007, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p43
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
We highlight the importance of information for consumer-driven healthcare (CDHC), describe barriers, display data on adoption rates and product features, and use a new health modeling approach to investigate the potential impact on national healthcare expenditures. We conclude with an assessment of the prospects for CDHC as a revolution of information, competition, and market orientation; and we discuss potential pitfalls, including concern regarding vulnerable populations. While the jury is out on the ultimate effects, enrollment in CDHC programs--while still small--is growing rapidly; utilization and costs for subscribers appear to be moderating; and creative benefit structures emphasize health promotion alongside previously unseen cost consciousness.
ACCESSION #
25733877

 

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