TITLE

UNCLOS MythBusters

AUTHOR(S)
Truver, Scott C.
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings;Jul2007, Vol. 133 Issue 7, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents misconceptions about the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) that affect the U.S. sea services. One of these fallacies is the thinking that the UNCLOS is redundant for the U.S. because a customary international law will protect its interests. Another false belief states that the U.S. surrenders sovereignty by participating in the UN. Most people think that the UN would allow an international tribunal to sabotage the operations of the U.S. sea services.
ACCESSION #
25683425

 

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