TITLE

Forced into Early Retirement…

PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Financial Planning;Jul2007, Vol. 20 Issue 7, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on retirement of workers in the United States. It mentions that a Retirement Confidence Survey put out by the Employee Benefit Research Institute confirmed some of the findings by Boston College's Center for Retirement Research that was cited in the June 2007 issue of "The Observer." The article comments that the Retirement Confidence Survey revealed that workers are planning to retire later than they did in 1997. It states that workers are retiring later than they did in 1996, but that they are retiring earlier than what current workers plan to. It mentions that the majority of workers who retired early did so because of health or disability issues, job loss, or needing to care for an ill spouse or family member.
ACCESSION #
25657153

 

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