TITLE

Microfabricated saturation-absorption spectrometer rivals tabletop performance

PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Laser Focus World;Jun2007, Vol. 43 Issue 6, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the fabrication of a prototype saturation-absorption spectrometer by the researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado. The said system could be used to provide a stable optical frequency at 795, 780, and 852 nm by locking a single-mode diode laser to an atomic transition in rubidium or to provide frequency stabilization of telecom lasers between 1540 and 1590 nm by adding a poled lithium niobate waveguide.
ACCESSION #
25485627

 

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