TITLE

Large employers call for health, benefits overhaul

AUTHOR(S)
Young, Jeffrey
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Hill;6/14/2007, Vol. 14 Issue 71, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the proposal made by a coalition of employers for some reforms on healthcare and retirement system in the U.S. The main objective of the reform is to control the increasing costs borne by the private sector and to provide workers with more benefits. Large employers are also concerned with the long-term costs of providing benefits to their employees.
ACCESSION #
25414071

 

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