TITLE

Teaching James Joyce's Short Fiction: Dubliners in the Creative Writing Classroom

AUTHOR(S)
Cole, Catherine
PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
Eureka Studies in Teaching Short Fiction;Spring2007, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article provides insights for creative writing teachers on how to introduce their students to the short stories of James Joyce and what benefits would be provided in a close study of the writing. According to the author, the epiphanic nature of Joyce's stories makes an effect like sunbursts of light on a canvas. She stresses that the role of the narrator and the presence of the writer in the text offer important pedagogical ideas.
ACCESSION #
25357052

 

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