TITLE

Is presumed consent the answer to organ shortages? NO

AUTHOR(S)
Wright, Linda
PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);5/26/2007, Vol. 334 Issue 7603, p1089
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's opinions on whether presumed consent, which assumes that deceased people want to donate their organs unless there is evidence to the contrary, will solve a shortage of organs which exists in Great Britain. Arguments are presented which suggest that presumed consent will not answer the organ shortage and has not eliminated waiting lists despite evidence that increased organ donations in some countries, and that strategies to encourage people to donate seem to help the supply of organs.
ACCESSION #
25266883

 

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