Investors going 'crackers' over Indonesia

Richardson, John
April 2007
ICIS Chemical Business;4/9/2007, Vol. 2 Issue 61, p18
Trade Publication
The article reveals the reasons for the growing interest of investors in building crackers in Indonesia. An economic recovery could lead to gross domestic product growth reaching 6 percent in 2007. The country will need to import 500,000 tonnes of ethylene and 179,000 tonnes of propylene during the year, according to the Indonesian Plastics Association. There has been an increase in deficits down all the product chains.


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